Secession and State Banks

The only state in America presently that could even have a snowball’s chance in hell of successfully seceding from the Union is North Dakota. That is because North Dakota owns a State Bank.

Secession will not work without The Power of The Purse. And the best…arguably the ONLY way that secession will work…is when the new sovereign nation owns its bank. Think about it. The Federal Reserve system won’t let a seceded state use THEIR currency. They won’t clear checks. They won’t lend.

Marilyn Barnewall is the foremost expert in North America on state banks. She has released a four-part video series, each part about 14-15 minutes. She says all that needs to be said about state banking. If you are serious about secession, you MUST understand this information.

Here are the first two videos. The last two will appear tomorrow.

PART ONE

PART TWO
part 2

DumpDC. Six Letters That Can Change History.

© Copyright 2011, Russell D. Longcore. Permission to reprint in whole or in part is gladly granted, provided full credit is given.

8 Responses to Secession and State Banks

  1. Richard says:

    The state of Utah, mentioned elsewhere, has passed a law which allows the use of gold and silver coinage. That’s a fast track method for financing state transactions. Quick and Easy.

    Several months ago I sent emails to my state representatives here in Florida. I included a link to North Dakota, the only state run bank in the country. I also asked if our legislators had considered the advantages of a State Bank of Florida.

    I received a resounding “duh”.

  2. waking up says:

    Thank you for that very interesting and informative presentation. We need more information like that which will enable us, the citizens of the US, to be proactive regarding the coming ,and present,crisis. Thanks again and keep this type of programs coming.

  3. Mark H says:

    I see no reason why citizens of a state that secedes couldn’t continue to use Federal Reserve Notes, if they wanted to. Many citizens of other countries trade them freely. In Costa Rica they are like a second currency, from what I understand. More than half of all U.S. dollars are held overseas.

    But if the state believes in freedom, few people will choose to use Federal Reserve Notes, because the state will allow people to use whatever they want to use for money. Private currencies 100% backed by gold and silver would immediately become the most popular form of money, in my opinion. This would happen in the USA too, if it were not for legal tender laws and sales taxes which make it illegal and impractical to use gold and silver as money. Ron Paul’s proposed Free Competition in Currencies Act would make this possible.

    • dumpdc says:

      Dear MArk-
      What country DOESN’T have their own money? And besides, I envision a gold/silver-baked money in a seceded state. Combine the hard currency with internal control and you have a sovereign nation. No external banking system has the new nation by the throat. And the Federal Reserve system would use their services as a punishment to the seceding state. Russ

      • Mark H says:

        Yes, gold and silver are best. In a free society, our notes, debit cards and electronic transfers would represent the gold or silver we have on deposit in a private bank. The units would be not “dollars,” but “grams of gold,” etc. With money production in private rather than government hands, the marketplace will choose what our coins and bills will look like, so they will no longer be restricted to depicting dead presidents. Government’s only involvement with money would be to enforce contracts and laws against fraud.

  4. Hey You says:

    You ask what country doesn’t have their own money (currency)?

    From personal experience in visiting, I know that Panama uses US dollars.

  5. […] would be nice if North Dakota secedes. They have a state bank that serves the public and not private interest for profit. Their economy is unscathed by the […]

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